CITES Permits and Certificates

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CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) is an international agreement between governments. Its aim is to ensure that international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants does not threaten their survival. The CITES convention was created so that different countries could work cooperatively towards this goal.

Trade of wild animals and plants takes place beyond the borders between countries, and its regulation requires international cooperation aiming to protect certain species from excessive exploitation. CITES was thus conceived within the framework of such cooperative spirit. Today, it offers different levels of protection to a total of more than 33,000 species, (5,000 animal and 28,000 plant), whether they are traded as live specimens, as fur coats, as dried herbs, or processed in any other way.

Which Administrative Authorities are in charge of issuing import permits and certifications?

In Spain, in compliance with Royal Decree No. 1739, of 20 November 1997, these authorities are:

  • Main Administrative Authority: General Secretariat of Foreign Trade (Ministry of Economy).
  • Additional Administrative Authority: Department of Customs and Special Taxes of the National Agency for Tax Administration (Treasury Department).
  • Scientific Authority: General Directorate of Conservation of Nature (Ministry of Environment).

Click here to see the list of CITES administrative authorities in other countries

Where does verification of imported species take place?

The European Union, through the Council’s Regulation No. 338/97, states that Member States shall designate customs offices where verifications will be carried out in order to introduce, as well as to export, those specimens of species subject to the Regulation.

Currently authorized Spanish customs offices are: Alicante, Barcelona, Bilbao, Madrid, Gran Canaria, Santa Cruz de Tenerife, Palma de Mallorca, Seville, Valencia, Malaga, Algeciras, La Coruña, and Santiago de Compostela. All of them must be equipped with a Technical Assistance and Foreign Trade Inspection Center (CATICE). Exceptionally, imports, exports, and re-exports may be processed in a customs office different from the ones authorized.

How does CITES affect the wood industry?

Some wood species are under CITES regulations. The stocks of these woods that Madinter has have been declared before the corresponding CITES administrative authority and are therefore controlled by the convention.

These woods may require a special permit to be sold or bought. Depending on the wood species, whether it is being sold as a raw material or as a finished product, and if it will be moved to a different country, a CITES permit may be required. In such cases, Madinter will inform the customer and make all the necessary arrangements to obtain the permit.

The different species that are controlled by CITES are listed in three Appendices, depending on the level of protection they need.

At Madinter, we trade the following species covered by CITES:

Appendix I

Species in this appendix need a permit for all transactions and movements, both inside and outside the European Union.

Dalbergia nigra – Brazilian Rosewood – This species needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought in all circumstances, whether it is as raw wood or as a finished product.

Appendix II

Species in this appendix only need a CITES permit to go through customs, therefore, they do not need a permit to be shipped within the European Union.

Swietenia macrophylla – American Mahogany – This species only needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought as raw wood. Once it has been transformed into a finished product, it does not need a permit.

Caesalpinia echinata – Brazilwood – This species only needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought as raw wood. Once it has been transformed into a finished product, it does not need a permit.

Guibourtia demeusei, Guibourtia pellegriniana and Guibourtia tessmannii – Bubinga – This species needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought in all circumstances, whether it is as raw wood or as a finished product.

Dalbergia stevensonii – Honduran Rosewood – This species needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought in all circumstances, whether it is as raw wood or as a finished product.

Dalbergia baronii – Madagascar Rosewood – This species needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought in all circumstances, whether it is as raw wood or as a finished product.

Dalbergia retusa – Cocobolo – This species needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought in all circumstances, whether it is as raw wood or as a finished product.

Dalbergia latifolia – Indian Rosewood – This species needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought in all circumstances, whether it is as raw wood or as a finished product.

Dalbergia melanoxylon – African Blackwood – This species needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought in all circumstances, whether it is as raw wood or as a finished product.

Dalbergia cearensis – Kingwood – This species needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought in all circumstances, whether it is as raw wood or as a finished product.

Appendix III

Species in this appendix only need a CITES permit to go through customs, therefore, they do not need a permit to be shipped within the European Union.

Cedrela odorata – Brazilian Cedar. – This species only needs a CITES permit to be sold or bought as raw wood. Once it has been transformed into a finished product, it does not need a permit.

How does CITES affect the musical instrument industry?

Some wood species observed by CITES do not need to have a permit when they are part of a finished product, such as a guitar. Therefore, a guitar made with any of the following species will not need a permit to travel across borders or to be sold abroad:

Swietenia macrophylla – American Mahogany

Caesalpinia echinata – Brazilwood

Cedrela odorata – Brazilian Cedar.

However, other species do need a permit when they have been transformed into a finished products. A guitar made of the following species will need a CITES permit to be exported and imported:

Dalbergia nigra – Brazilian Rosewood

Dalbergia stevensonii – Honduran Rosewood

Dalbergia baronii – Madagascar Rosewood

Dalbergia retusa – Cocobolo

Dalbergia latifolia – Indian Rosewood

Dalbergia melanoxylon – African Blackwood

Dalbergia cearensis – Kingwood

Guibourtia demeusei, Guibourtia pellegriniana and Guibourtia tessmannii – Bubinga

With the exception of Brazilian Rosewood (Dalbergia nigra), guitars made of these species will need a permit to be bought or sold, but non-commercial movements will not need a CITES permit. Therefore, a musician will be able to travel with his guitar, as long as he doesn’t sell it during the trip.

A guitar made of Brazilian Rosewood (Dalbergia nigra), however, will need a permit for non-commercial movements.

The CITES changes in 2017

Between September 24th and October 5th 2016, some changes in CITES regulations were agreed at the CITES CoP 17 conference in Johannesburg, South Africa. The updated regulations are applicable since January 2nd 2017. The most significant changes for the music industry are:

  • Inclusion of all species of Dalbergia in CITES II.
  • Inclusion of Bubinga (Guibourtia demeusei, Guibourtia pellegriniana and Guibourtia tessmannii) in CITES II.
  • The assignment of an annotation # 15 to Bubinga (Guibourtia demeusei, Guibourtia pellegriniana and Guibourtia tessmannii) and to all species of Dalbergia (except the Dalbergia nigra, which is the only one in Appendix I of CITES, without annotation).

Species that are commonly used in guitar manufacturing have been included in CITES. In addition, finished products, such as musical instruments, that contain any quantity of these wood species will now need a CITES permit to be exported and imported.

https://cites.org/eng/app/2017/E-Appendices-2017-01-02.pdf

https://cites.unia.es/file.php/1/files/CAN-CITES_Wood_Guide.pdf

 

 

 

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